Heart FAQ

Ways to reduce the risk of Metabolic Syndrome

Many people can do with lowering the risk factors that lead to heart disease. Metabolic syndrome is characterized by a group of metabolic risk factors in one person. These include elevated blood pressure. Abdominal obesity (excessive fat tissue in and around the abdomen), insulin resistance or glucose intolerance (the body can’t properly use insulin or blood sugar).

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What Causes Angina?

Angina is caused by reduced blood flow to an area of the heart. This is most often due to Coronary Artery Disease. Sometimes, other types of heart disease or uncontrolled high blood pressure can cause angina.

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What causes Myocardial Infarction?

The most common cause of a Myocardial Infarction (MI) is a blood clot known as thrombosis. This forms inside a coronary artery, or one of its branches. This blocks the blood flow to a part of the heart.

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What Is Angina?

Angina is a symptom of Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), the most common type of heart disease. This happens when the plaque builds up in the coronary arteries. This build up of plaque is called atherosclerosis. As the plaque builds up, the coronary arteries become narrower and stiff. Blood flow to the heart is then reduced. This decreases the oxygen supply to the heart muscle.

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What is Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery?

This is a type of heart surgery. It's sometimes called CABG ("cabbage"). The surgery reroutes, or "bypasses," blood around clogged arteries to improve blood flow and oxygen to the heart.

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What is Pericarditis?

The pericardium is a thin, sac-like covering (a membrane) that surrounds the heart. The outer layer of the pericardium surrounds the roots of the heart's major blood vessels. Ligaments attach this layer to their spinal column, diaphragm, and other parts of the body.

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What is Tachycardia?

Heart disease is a global problem that affects both rich and poor countries. Tachycardia is one of many medical health conditions that relate to the heart. In a normal adult, the average heart beat is sixty to one hundred beats per minute. A heart beating above one hundred beats per minute is called Tachycardia (the heart is pumping too fast).

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What are the symptoms of a Myocardial Infarction?

Severe chest pain is the main symptom. The pain may also travel up into the jaw, down the left arm, or down both arms. The person may also be sweating, feel sick, and feel faint. The pain may be similar to angina; however, it is usually more severe and lasts longer.

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What causes mitral valve prolapse?

Mitral valve prolapse (MVP) is among the most common heart conditions; however it remains something of a puzzle. Although MVP affects about two percent of the population, the cause is unknown. MVP often occurs in people who have no other heart problems, and the condition may be inherited.

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What is a Myocardial Infarction?

Myocardial infarction (MI) means that part of the heart muscle suddenly loses its blood supply. Without immediate treatment, this can lead to damage to the affected part of the heart. An MI is often called a heart attack or a coronary thrombosis.

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What is Cardiomyopathy?

Cardiomyopathy is a serious disease in which the heart muscle becomes inflamed and doesn't work as well as it should. There may be multiple causes including viral infections.

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What is mitral valve prolapse?

Mitral valve prolapse (MVP) is still amongst the more common heart diseases; although it remains something of a puzzle. Now although MVP affects around two percent of the population, the cause is still unknown and has scientist wanting to know what does cause it. MVP often occurs in people who have no other heart problems, and the condition may be inherited.

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What is Peripheral Vascular Disease?

Peripheral vascular disease (PVD) involves damage to or blockage in the blood vessels distant from your heart, the peripheral arteries and veins. The peripheral arteries and veins carry blood to and from arm and leg muscles plus the organs in and below the stomach area. PVD may also affect the arteries leading to your head.

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Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome

In a normal heart, electrical signals use only one path whilst moving through the heart. This is the atrio-ventricular or A-V node. As the electrical signal moves from the hearts upper chambers (the atria) to the lower chambers (the ventricles), it causes the heart to beat. For the heart to beat properly, the timing of the electrical signal is important.

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